Marriage means different things to different people. For some, marriage is just a piece of paper. (In fact, the Pew Research Center found that almost 4 in 10 Americans think marriage is obsolete.) For others, marriage is a nice but perhaps unreachable ideal. And for others still, marriage is desirable but just hasn’t happened yet. (More Pew Research data found that about 6 in 10 unmarried Americans want to get married.)

Regardless of what people think about marriage, here’s the question: Does marriage really matter? Is the institution of marriage obsolete, or is it something that can benefit individuals, families, and society as a whole?

Here are a few reasons why social science suggests that marriage really does matter.

1. Marriage Strengthens Families

While non-traditional families can still have a great deal of love, social science research shows that marriage promotes even stronger relationships. For example, according to the Institute for American Values, when parents are married, they’re more likely to have positive relationships with their children.

Marriage also provides a more stable family environment for kids. An international report from the Social Trends Institute found that children born to cohabiting parents are “more likely to see their parents split by age 12 than children born into married families.”

 

Want to learn more about why marriage matters? Read the rest of the article on Family Good Things

 


For those that don't know, S.M.I.L.E. stands for "spiritually minded is life eternal" that comes from 2 Nephi 9:39. This is a perfect gift for the grandchildren, missionaries, baptisms or any other special occasion that you may be having."